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PLANT CARE CARDS

Get the lowdown on how to look after your Botanic Box plant baby

April - Sansevieria dwarf

You've heard of the sansevieria (mother-in-law's tongue), well this is the little sister! The sansevieria dwarf is a succulent that grows with stiff and wide white-striped leaves. It thrives on neglect. Seriously.
WATER:
Handles dry and poor soil conditions but appreciates good well-drained soil inside or outside.  Easy does it with the watering. You want to be careful not to overdo it because your plant will rot out.  Always make sure the soil is almost completely dry before watering again. Water every 2-6 weeks.
Botanic Box Dwarf Snake Plant Kalliope Collective Online Subscription Indoor Plants
LIGHT:
As a houseplant, it does best in bright light but tolerates low light levels indoors as well. Outdoors bright direct sun to full sun. 

 

March - Tillandsia

WATER:

If you keep your air plants indoors, they will be healthiest when spraying them with water approx twice per week. Plants that are constantly being dried out from A/C or heaters will require more moisture than a plant that is located in a more humid environment.

You can also soak your plants. This can be done by placing them upside down in a cup of water for approx 2 hours. Try to avoid soaking their feet (roots or base). Take care to gently shake any excess water off the base of the plants, as sitting water can cause rot and damage/kill the plant. It is recommended that you water your plants in the morning, and leave them out of their containers in an area that they can dry within 4 hours. Never let your air plant sit in water for prolonged periods of time or let their base sit on a wet surface for long period (e.g. in wet sand).

Remember that each plant variety is different and will require different watering schedules than others. Never put your air plants in soil; the moisture from the soil will harm them!

AIRPLANTDESIGNS

LIGHT:

One of the most important things any living creature needs is light and air plants are no exception. If you are keeping your plants indoors, you will want to make sure that they are near an adequate light source. Choose a location that receives plenty of indirect light, preferably from a window facing east or west, so it receives a nice burst of morning sun or late afternoon sun, when the rays are less intense. Remember too much sun or a direct blast of midday sun can burn them. If you are keeping your plants outside, make sure they are in a shaded area, that does not receive all day full sun. There are only a few varieties that can handle direct sun.

TERRARIUM/GLOBES:

If you are planning on keeping your air plants in a terrarium or globe, you will need to remove the plant for normal watering and make sure to leave the plant out until it has had enough time to completely dry. Usually, 4 hours will do. When the Tillandsia is in the terrarium or globe, you can give it a periodic misting to create some humidity. The smaller and more compact the globe, the less misting you will want to give your plants. If the terrarium is larger and has better air circulation, you can give it a few sprays from a water mister a few times a week. Just make sure to take care in ensuring the plant does not get over misted and that it dries within a few hours while in the terrarium.

Choose a location for your terrarium that receives plenty of indirect light. Keep in mind that glass is reflective and will bounce back the light onto the plant.

A common sign that your air plant is receiving insufficient light is discolourisation of the leaves. They might appear healthy for months and then one day just fall apart. If a plant does not receive enough light, it's ability to photosynthesis will stop.

AIR:

Another important variable that is important to your air plant is, you guessed it, Air. The plants will need good clean air circulation to survive and live a healthy life. It is important that after watering the plants they have enough air circulation to dry within 4 hours. While air plants will do well in containers, it is recommended that they do not be displayed in enclosed/airtight containers and that they are completely dry before they are put back into a container that might restrict air circulation.

Air conditioning is not natural air flow and can tend to dry your plant out if it is placed in direct access to the air conditioner.

 

February - Fern

February Botanic Box Fern Indoor Plant Subscription

Ferns are popular for indoors with their long lacy fronds. They prefer slightly humid conditions and a well-lit, protected position, so get these growing conditions right and you’ll have a lovely indoor fern all year round. They can also be grown in the garden making them quite a versatile plant.

Position: In a cool well-lit spot away from direct sunlight.


Watering: 
Soak the pot in water once a month to make sure the potting mix is well hydrated. Try not to overwater your fern, you can test the soil with a bare finger, if it feels dry then water it.

January - Devils Ivy

January Devils Ivy

 

 

 

Categorised under the genus Epipremnum, Devil’s ivy is a lush and hardy plant that can survive in minimal light and is almost impossible to kill. This evergreen trailing vine will thrive all year round, although variegated varieties may lose their colour in low-light conditions. Surviving well in a variety of positions, the diverse range of different-hued forms are a perfect accent to any indoor or sheltered outdoor space. Devil’s ivy can be grown as a ground cover, in hanging baskets, in containers or along walls. It will grow to around 6m, but up to 20m in the wild.

Position: grows well in full to partial shade outdoors. Indoors, Devil’s ivy prospers to the greatest extent with bright light, but will also grow in low-light conditions.

Watering: keep moist but allow the surface of the potting mix or soil to dry out between each watering. Usually once a week for indoor plants.